Cremation

The Church, through the centuries, has followed the practice of burial or entombment after the manner of Christ's burial because of our respect for the human body as a temple of the Holy Spirit and because of our faith in the resurrection. It is still the express will of the Church that this hallowed and traditional practice be maintained. However, recognizing particular circumstances and varying cultures and customs in different parts of the world, the Church issued an instruction in 1963 on cremation which grants some latitude, under certain conditions, to those Catholics who request that their bodies be cremated.

Cremation may be requested for hygienic, economic or other reasons of a public or private nature. The transfer of remains to a distant place, possible avoidance of considerable expense, and national tradition or custom are some examples of reasons why a cremation might be requested.

The selection of cremation generally is the specific choice of the individual before death.

When cremation has been chosen, the various elements of the funeral rite will be conducted in the usual way as if the body is present.

The Catholic Diocese of Harrisburg changed the procedure for cremation. While cremation became an acceptable practice in the Catholic Church in 1963, the cremains were not allowed in the church at the time of the funeral Mass. In the new regulations, it is still preferred that the body of the deceased be brought to the Church for the Mass prior to cremation. However, if the body is cremated prior to the Mass, the cremains may be brought into the Church with the Paschal Candle positioned nearby.

Another important matter to address with the family of someone who is cremated is the cremains are to be accorded proper respect as befits the dignity of the human person and of baptized Christians and placed in consecrated ground. Cremated remains must be buried in a cemetery or entombed in a mausoleum or columbarium. The remains should not be scattered in the sea, on the ground, or from the air, nor should the cremains be kept in the home of a friend or relative of the deceased.

Two 48-niche columbariums for cremation burials are located in the Lay Burial Circle. Each niche can hold two urns. The cost for internment in the columbarium, including etchig is $1,100.00 for a single inurnment and $1,450.00 for a double inurnment. There is no additional opening and closing cost for the columbarium only. More information about fees at Corpus Christi Cemetary can be found on our fees page. Etching of names and dates is done in white lettering. Each niche measurement is 11.5" x 11.5" x 11.5". One or two urns must be able to fit into this space.

If you have any questions, please contact Diane McCarty at the parish center at 717-264-6317 or at dmccarty@corpuschristichbg.org.

Corpus Christi Roman Catholic Church

320 Philadelphia Avenue

Chambersburg, PA 17201

717-264-6317

dmccarty@corpuschristichbg.org

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